‘Trump SHOOTING HIMSELF in foot’: US-Turkey sanctions may STRENGTHEN Syria — Информационное Агентство "365 дней"

‘Trump SHOOTING HIMSELF in foot’: US-Turkey sanctions may STRENGTHEN Syria

Trump and Erdogan

The spat between the US and Turkey has resulted in a plummeting lira and a souring of relations between the NATO allies.

But both President Donald Trump and President Recep Tayyip Erdogan are adversaries of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, a Baathist leader whom both countries attempted to topple in the wake of a 2011 rebel uprising.

While Turkey has engaged in peace talks with Assad sponsors Russia and Iran, the US military has regularly underscored the vitality of Turkish cooperation in Syria.

And the Pentagon has denied support for Kurdish fighters battling Turkey.

However, Mr Trump has threatened and ultimately imposed a wave of punitive economic measures on Ankara.

Joshua Landis, who heads the University of Oklahoma’s Centre for Middle East Studies and the online blog Syria Comment, told Newsweek: “It appears there are two contradictory things going on in US foreign policy.

“One being driven by the White House for domestic reasons and one driven by the Department of Defence for strategic reasons.”

The US sanctions were imposed in response to the arrest and confinement of American evangelical pastor Andrew Brunson.

Hassan Rouhani

Mr Brunson stands accused of conspiring with banned groups in Turkey to oust Mr Erdogan in the failed 2016 coup d’état attempt.

Читайте так-же:
China v USA: October summit could be CANCELLED as trade war tensions soar

The US-born pastor, who has resided in Turkey for more than two decades, is facing espionage and terrorism charges.

Mr Brunson has denied the accusations.

Turkey’s forces stormed northern Syria in 2016 in a bid to help its local allies push back the Syrian Democratic Forces–aligned People’s Protection Units.

After a second invasion earlier this year, they managed to end Kurdish control over the northwestern district of Afrin in March.


The US did not intervene in the dispute, despite styling itself as an ally of both Turkey and the Syrian Democratic Forces.

About a week later, Trump took to social media to warn of “large sanctions on Turkey for their longtime detainment of Pastor Andrew Brunson”.

Ankara’s defiant response came soon after, with the Turkish Foreign Ministry cautioning on August 10 that the US “cannot get any results through such kind of sanctions and pressures and that these will only harm our alliance which was forged by hardest challenges” and promising a “befitting response”.

In a fiery rebuke to the US-imposed sanctions, Mr Erdogan said: “You act on one side as a strategic partner, but on the other, you fire bullets into the foot of your strategic partner.

“We are together in NATO and then you seek to stab your strategic partner in the back.”

Читайте так-же:
Japan considers plan to END PACIFISM in major constitutional reform as China tensions rise

Syria

Syria is already starting to capitalise on the ongoing feud, with its military sending large numbers of reinforcements to retake the final rebel-held province, Idlib, where Turkish troops are posted to enforce a cease-fire reached last year by Turkey, Russia and Iran.

With only Russian troops standing between the Syrian military and a much smaller contingent of Turkish forces, Erdogan may be forced to seek a new deal with Moscow.

Mr Landis said: “Normally, Turkey would look to the US for support in dealing with Russia and Syria.

“The US is a NATO partner; just as the US and Turkey’s relationship is spiralling out of control, Erdogan is looking to the US, and the US is not going to help him.

“So he is going to go to Russia, and Russia is really in the driver’s seat.”

He added: “We don’t know how it’s going to come out yet, but America is nowhere to be seen and that’s odd.

“It shows that America is not making the most of its diplomacy and is sort of shooting itself in the foot.”

Подпишись на канал 365NEWS.BIZ в Яндекс.Дзен
Загрузка...
Загрузка...
x